Archives For children’s ministry

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Ever since I came to Fellowship Bible Church to work with preteens, one of the things I’ve focused on is our strategy for letting go of the bike. If you haven’t heard the phrase “letting go of the bike”, I strongly encourage you to head over to FourFiveSix.org and check it out.

We really want to create environments that unleash preteens to explore faith and put it into practice. We are finding ways to provide the “lab” to accompany the “lecture.” As we’ve experimented, we’ve seen preteens taking ownership of their faith and moving into new levels of discipleship and service. So, how do you let go of the bike? Here are a few things that have helped us take that step

Leave Room for Questions
We have really encouraged our small group mentors to leave room for questions. As they communicate the lesson, we want them to encourage push back and questions from the students. We want preteens to know that the best way to know God more is to ask questions. Just ask Nicodemus… 

Always Ask Questions
Not only do we want to hear their questions, but we also want to hear preteen answers. We’ve made it a habit to include surveys with the lessons. The responses from preteens show us what they really learned and what they are still questioning. The surveys are a great way to evaluate whether our methods are supporting our message. If we want preteens to learn how to pray, did we provide opportunities for them to pray? Check out The Method is the Message.

Provide Practice
For me, taking ownership of faith involved growing through service. We want to provide preteens with opportunities to serve others together. We want small groups to be involved in serving the church and the community. We want to unleash them with what they’ve learned to go make a difference in the world. This month, we’ve encouraged preteens to be involved in two ways: feeding orphans through www.RiceBowls.org and serving as a buddy with the Miracle League of Arkansas. Through different opportunities and experiences, preteens learn to see how God has wired them to serve Him.

As a parent, leader, or church, how are you letting go of the bike?

If you ask any size group of preteens if they have experienced or witnessed bullying, the vast majority of them would answer, “Yes!” In fact, research suggests that 97% of middle school students have personally experienced a form of bullying. These students suffer visible and invisible effects from these experiences. Whether it is cyber-bullying, physical bullying, or verbal/emotional bullying, those that work with preteens need to be helping them deal with this tough topic. On any given day, over 160,000 kids will stay home from school because of fear and anxiety caused by bullying. It’s heartbreaking to think of the damages.

October is Bully Prevention Awareness Month

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Today is Blue Shirt Day

Students across the nation will be wearing blue shirts and blue wristbands in support of a movement to end bullying in their schools.  Principals and teachers have worked hard to increase awareness of bullying and to prevent its occurrence in their schools. Those who work with preteens in the church should also be addressing this subject. Preteens need to experience the truth of God’s Word and what it says about our relationships with others.

Here are some great resources for talking with preteens about bullying:

  • Bullying—Taking Down Goliath—Preteenministry.net has great resources for teaching and discipling preteens.  If you’re a ministry leader, check out this four-week series on bullying.

I love my church and I love my job. Here is just another example of why:

Our ministry team spent the morning studying the results from a study we did called Your Unique Design. The study maps out 6 parts to personality and how they interact with each other. Every individual has all 6 parts, but we also have a foundational part that will dominate our behavior.

After understanding our own makeup, it is amazing to learn how to use the knowledge to better communicate with one another.  For example, I found that the majority of our team members, including my boss, were “Harmonizers,” which meant they operate based on emotions/feelings. I do not primarily operate from that foundation, so the study taught me some great tips on how I can better communicate with them based on our differences. The study states how we react under stress, how we receive and dispense information, and it even gives a guide to the particular daily activities that will energize us.

Great leadership is defined by knowing who it is you’re leading.

Sure, you need to have vision and strategy, but that is all hollow if you don’t know how to effectively communicate it with the people you’re leading. This is why it is critical that we understand the personalities that exist under our leadership.

Knowing the people who follow your leadership is important because…

  • it dictates the way you communicate with them.
  • you can better predict how they will react in stressful settings.
  • you will know how to better handle conflict between individuals based on personality
  • you will know how to encourage them based on their foundational personality
  • you will know how to correct them based on their foundational personality
  • you will hire/recruit the right person for the right job
  • you understand who God has wired them to be as part of the Body

Go check out the Servants by Design Inventory to find out how your team can use this valuable resource!
Later this week, I’ll be sharing how this same study can be used to better understand the kids that you’re raising at home or leading in ministry!

D6 Conference: Day 1

September 23, 2011 — Leave a comment

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Thursday was actually conference “day 1” at D6 and it opened with a session that included Doug Fields and David Platt—talk about a wake up call!  The rest of the day was FULL of absolutely amazing speakers like Dannah Gresh, Emmerson Eggerichs, Tim Kimmel, John McGee, and probably some others that I missed. But the first two really caught my heart and had me thinking the rest of the day.

Doug Fields’ message challenged us in our frustration and exhaustion of ministry to renew our love for Jesus Christ.  At the end of the day, this is what matters most and ultimately what will fuel our ministry efforts.  Doug challenged us to be leaders who…

  • Can authentically say, “Follow me, as I follow Jesus”—Is Jesus the most famous person in your church? In your ministry?
  • Value a collective vision—Humbly accept that we are better together than we are alone.
  • Are acutely aware of the “twisters” [issues, forces, conflicts] impacting families—Are we adding to the “twisters” that families face? Are we making suggestions from the pulpit that we’re not living out at home?

Next, David Platt spoke from the premise of his book Radical.  He posed the question, “How do we pour the Gospel into the next generation in a way that makes Christ’s glory known in all the world and in all generations?”  David spoke from Luke 9 on the three conversations Jesus had with those that wanted to follow him. He drew these challenging exhortations to parents from this passage of Scripture:

  • Teach children to treasure the person of Christ more than the possessions of this world
  • Tell children that God’s Kingdom is infinitely more important than their family
  • Train children to love the Lord enough to gladly leave their home behind

His talk boiled down to one statement on our purpose as parents.  The goal, as Platt describes it, is:

For our kids to love a Great God in a way that would lead them to abandon the things of this world, their family, and their home in order to follow Him!

This was challenging for me as a pastor, but even more so as a parent.  That’s not to say that I’m doing everything right as a pastor—far from it.  It just means that I’m not nearly the man, husband, or father that God has called me to be. I think I already knew that, but God has really pressed me over the last 24 hours and made me process that fact fully.

After much thought and evaluation, my take-away that I want to share with every other preteen ministry leader is this:

My legacy is not my ministry.  My legacy is my home.

God has called me into ministry, but I have a superseding call to be a man, husband, and father that follows hard after Christ. I know that I forsake my family to do ministry related tasks.  I change or cancel family plans all the time because of a ministry conflict, but I hardly ever put my family obligation before the ministry. This has to change…this will change.

 

Ps. The night was capped off with an acoustic session with Steven Curtis Chapman that was unbelievable.  He told the story of losing his daughter, Maria. The family went through so much pain and struggle, yet you can see them living in the midst of God’s sufficient grace. Everyone saw God’s grace and sovereignty in a new way as he sang, “You give and take away…my heart will choose to say, Lord, blessed be Your name.”