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We have guests attending our church every weekend. Some of them from the invitation of a friend and some of them just because they decided on Saturday night to get up the next morning and find a church.

For a little while now, I’ve made an effort to send each of these families a handwritten card that lets them know how thankful we are that they worshipped with us, asks specifically about how the morning went for their kids, and gives my contact information so that I can help them get more involved with the church.

I send multiple cards every week, and I pray that each one will encourage the family to continue making church a part of their week. In the last couple of weeks, I’ve gotten to see the power of a handwritten note.

On Sunday, I watched a family checking in their kids at our Welcome Desk. As I overheard their name, I immediately recognized it as one of the handwritten cards from the previous week. I introduced myself to the family and before I could say anything more than my name, the wife turned to her husband and said, “He’s the one that wrote that handwritten card!”

I laughed and said, “Yes, that was me. I try to make contact with every family by sending a little note.” And as if I hadn’t heard her the first time, she said with even more emphasis, “And it was handwritten!”

I walked with the family to their child’s class, and then we went separate ways. But that brief conversation reminded me that there is power in taking the time to write a handwritten note.

Everybody gets emails. Most people send and receive multiple text messages a day. But when is the last time you went to the mailbox and got a handwritten note? In a digital world, the handwritten note is such a powerful tool to convey interest and value.

The interesting thing about this conversation is I’ve had the exact same conversation at least half a dozen times in the last few months. Over and over again, this simple note sparks a conversation, a relationship, and opportunity to help families grow in their understanding of who Jesus is and what He has done for them.

Take some time this week and write a card to someone! A family member, a volunteer in your ministry, or a family that visited on Sunday—they all would love to open the mailbox and see their name scribbled in ink from the pen you’re holding.

A recent seminary assignment challenged me to think of the 10 truths that I want to teach my children. Typically, my answer would simply be the GOSPEL, but the assignment made me think more deeply about all that is encapsulated in that word and how I would break it down for my daughters.

The assignment was valuable because it challenged me to define what I believe and get intentional about how I will impress those truths on my children. Here is the list I came up with:

Top 10 Truths to Teach My Children

1. God is Sovereign
Genesis 1, Psalm 103:19, Proverbs 16:4, Isaiah 14; 45
We want our children to know God as supreme creator over all things. We want them to see that He is God and we are not. This must be taught in conjunction with the attributes of God to help them understand the goodness of His sovereignty.

2. God is unchanging and faithful
Hebrews 13:8, Malachi 3:6, Deuteronomy 7:9, 2 Timothy 2:13
We want our children to know that God is the same yesterday, today, and forever. The same power that we see on display throughout the Bible is in existence today. In the same way, God’s promises always remain true. The promises He has made will always come to fruition. We can trust God’s character and His promises.

3. Sin affects every aspect of my life and your life
Romans 3:23; 5:12; 6:23, Jeremiah 17:9
We want our children to know their depravity and the consequences of sin. We want to be open as parents about our struggle with sin and gratefulness for Christ. We want to set an example of repentance and dependence on Christ for any hope of change.

4. God’s Law shows us our sinfulness and how great our need is for Jesus
Romans 6:23, James 2:10, Romans 7:7, Galatians 3:19-24
We want our children to know that, while we strive to be obedient, we will never be able to obey God’s Law perfectly. The Law only reveals sin and condemns. At the same time, we want our children to see the hope that God graciously provides through Jesus—our salvation.

5. Jesus died in our place to give us the life we never deserved.
John 3:16, Ephesians 2, Titus 3:5, Galatians 4:4, 2 Corinthians 5:21
We want our children to see that Jesus was fully God and fully man, that He faced temptation yet lived a life of perfect obedience, and that He died a sinner’s death in our place so that in Him we might become the righteousness of God! We want our children to know this was an act of God’s grace, a demonstration of His love, and not based on anything we could do to save ourselves.

6. Belief in Jesus means we are adopted as God’s children and now live as a new creation
Ephesians 1, Galatians 4:1-5, 2 Corinthians 5:17-21, 1 John 3:1
We want our children to know what it means to fully believe in who Jesus is and what He has done for us. We want them to know that this faith in the finished work of Christ is the sole source of salvation and it means that we live as a new creation—forgiven, adopted, and called out to live as children of God.

7. The Holy Spirit helps believers to grow more and more like Christ.
John 14:26, Romans 8:26, Galatians 5:22-23
We want our children to know who the Holy Spirit is and how He helps us to grow as Christians. We want our children to know the fruit that the Holy Spirit produces in believers to make us more like Christ. We want them to seek out friends and future mates that are walking with Christ and show the fruit of the Spirit.

8. God’s Word is true and contains all we need for growing in our faith
Hebrews 4:12, 2 Timothy 3:16-17, Psalm 119
We want our children to cherish God’s Word and be disciplined in reading it, memorizing it, and applying it to their lives. We want them to see Scripture as sufficient for all issues of life in every season of life. We want to demonstrate a love for God’s Word that our children can emulate.

9. God has given us the Church where we can worship, serve, and grow with other believers.
Acts 2:42, 1 Corinthians 12, Matthew 28:19, Matthew 26:26-28
We want our children to know their gifting and their role in the body of Christ. We want them to be a part of a local body of believers to worship, serve, and grow. We also want them understand Baptism and Communion as part of a believer’s obedience and remembrance of Christ and how each of these sacraments fit into the life of the Church.

10. Jesus is coming back again to complete His work of redemption and restoration
Matthew 24:14, Romans 16:19-20, 1 Peter 3:10-13
We want our children to know that Jesus’ redemptive work is not yet complete but will be made complete when he returns. At that time, He will eternally destroy sin, restore creation to God’s design, and give us new glorified bodies to worship Him eternally.

What truths would you put in your top 10?
How will you be intentional about passing those truths on to your children?

The following is an article that I shared last year on the Fellowship Bible Church blog. In just a few weeks, we will send our daughter to her first day of Kindergarten. I’m excited about practicing some of these notes, and I thought it might be helpful to other parents.


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It’s time to go back to school.

I can hear the collective groan of children from all over the city. The memory-making events of summer are coming to a close, and parents’ days will soon be filled with school supplies, homework, pickup lines, and trying to fit all five food groups into that tiny lunch box!

I dreaded the first day of school every year. Well, every year except for one. The year I started second grade, my excitement was off the charts. I just knew that I was going to be the talk of the school because of my new G.I. Joe lunchbox.

This lunch box was bright red with locking latch. The front was decorated with the battle-ready cast of the cartoon. But the pièce de résistance was the Thermos. It featured a matching G.I. Joe design, and it had the lid that could also be used as cup. There was something classy and sophisticated about a second grader who could pour Kool-Aid into a cup and sip as if drinking tea with the Queen of England.

Whether your child has a G.I. Joe lunchbox or a paper sack, you can make it a great discipleship tool by including a special note from you.

Deuteronomy 6 specifically commands parents to pass faith on to children as they go throughout the day. Imagine your son or daughter sitting down for lunch, opening their lunchbox, and finding a special note from you to remind them of who God is and what He has done. These lunchbox notes can be your way of speaking Truth to your children even when you can’t be with them throughout the day.

Three types of notes that could be used to disciple your child through their lunchbox:

Affirmations or Encouragement

Every child needs and wants to hear encouragement from their parents. As you see the unique gifts and character that God has placed in your child, be sure to acknowledge and affirm that to them.

Try not to make this about their performance. Instead, focus on what the Holy Spirit is doing in them and through them. An example might be a note that says: I have noticed how patient you are with your little brother lately. I can see the Holy Spirit working in you.

Scripture and Prayer

There is nothing more necessary for children than to know Scripture. In a world of information, some children may not understand the authority of the Bible. As a parent, you can help them to store up God’s Word in their hearts.

This type of lunchbox note can be as simple as a Bible verse that you’ve been talking about as a family and a prayer. It might also include a question that the family will discuss at dinner. For example, I praise you because I am fearfully and wonderfully made; your works are wonderful, I know that full well. Psalm 139:14 God, help Maggie know that she was created in a wonderful way for a wonderful purpose. Help her to feel Your amazing love today!

Challenge

What kid doesn’t love a challenge? As children are growing in their faith, challenge them to apply it. This type of lunchbox note is geared to helping your son or daughter be more intentional in how they live out the Gospel in their school. Here’s an example: A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity. Proverbs 17:17 I challenge you to ask a friend or teacher this question: What’s one thing that is making you worry? Tonight, our family will pray for that person and for God to give them peace in that one thing!

The beginning of the school year is a great opportunity to be intentional in the discipleship of your child. As you’re packing their lunch with PB & J and handi-snacks, write a special note to encourage them, pray over them, or challenge them in their faith.

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Yesterday, our church announced some exciting changes happening in our Family Ministry. Our lead student pastor has moved into the role of Family Pastor and our Jr. High Pastor has stepped up to lead the student ministry. These guys are gifted leaders. I’m excited to see how God uses them in their new roles.

I’m also excited that I will get to work with them as I transition to my new role as FellowshipKids (FSK) Pastor. I will continue to provide leadership for our preteen ministry, but I will also be overseeing staff and programming for all of children’s ministry (birth thru 6th grade). I love this church and I love our children’s ministry staff, so I feel incredibly blessed.

I know this change will stretch and challenge me. It already has! I am praying and seeking God for direction, and I’m trusting In His grace and power.

As for the blog, I’m hoping to get back to sharing ideas, questions, and experiences. When I started in preteen ministry, so many of you gave me encouragement and insight. I’m counting on you to keep it up!