Archives For leadership

man-thinking-draft
I’m playing in 2 Fantasy Football leagues this year. The first league is with a group of pastors at our church, and the second league is with my family.

I felt honored to be invited into the pastor’s league, so I took the draft really seriously. I read all the expert opinions on players, I printed off team depth charts, and I even paid $4.99 for an iPad app that’s only purpose was to help me pick the right players!

After the 3-hour draft, I felt really good about my team and our chances of winning. I felt like all my work had paid off.

The league with my family was much less intense. I joined the league, made up a team name, and then waited for the computer to “auto-pick” my players at 4:00 am. When I got up this morning, I had an email telling me which players I had “picked.”

The two teams were almost identical!

With the exception of 2 players—2 out of 15—the teams were the same. I spent hours trying to make sure that I picked the right players in the first draft, and the second draft auto-picked the same players while I was asleep!

I usually live by the motto, “If you want it done right, do it yourself!” I’m always afraid that someone will screw up if I let them take over, so I end up doing the job myself. I realize that I spend a lot of my time “spinning my wheels” in areas that I should equip others to lead. These draft results reminded me that delegation is important, especially in ministry.

Here are some questions that I’m asking myself to help me delegate more:

1. What am I currently doing that only I can/should be doing?
2. What am I doing that someone else could do?
3. Who are the people around me that have talents in the areas I need to delegate?
4. How can I equip those individuals to “own” that area?
4. How can I support and encourage those that are taking responsibility of these areas?


Have you ever wondered what makes a great leader “great”? It’s the time of year when we are doing interviews and placing volunteers for the new ministry year. As we go through this process, I have been reminded of this quote:

The people in and around your ministry will define your ministry.

Preteens, parents, and other potential volunteers will make judgments about your ministry based on what they see, and what they predominately see are the volunteers that you place in ministry.

Does that make you nervous to think about? It makes me nervous! It also makes the process of enlisting leaders even more important. Here are some qualities that we look for in our recruitment and interview process:

1. Passionate faith
Our expectation is that a volunteer will encourage preteens to grow in their faith. To do so, it is imperative that a volunteer displays a passionate faith. A passionate faith is like a virus that spreads throughout the group and infects every member.

2. Value people and relationships
A volunteer called to build relationships with preteens needs to value relationships. Even more so, we want leaders that can develop relationships with other leaders and parents. These relationships are tremendously helpful to the entire ministry.

3. Teachable
Even the 20-year ministry veteran has room for growth, so leaders need to be teachable. In addition to being teachable, we look for leaders who are “teachers.” Every experience in ministry is an opportunity to learn and share with other leaders to help them grow. Leaders who are teachable and teachers are worth their weight in gold!

4. Balance
The commitment to ministry is not always convenient. Someone who is over-committed in many areas of life will never achieve their full potential in ministry. When enlisting leaders, look for individuals who show balance in their life. They will most likely be able to manage the commitment of ministry and be successful in it.

5. Experience
We would love for every volunteer to have 10-20 years of experience in preteen ministry, but that’s not likely and that’s not really what we mean by experience. Great leaders have experience that is life-based. They have spent time under a faithful mentor, or they have experienced God working in their life in a mighty way. This type of experience is a well to draw from when leading a group of preteens.

What qualities do you look for in potential volunteers?

I was reminded this week of the power that a father carries in the life of a son. From love to leadership, the father sets the example for manhood. Boys need their fathers. At the same time, there are so many young men that have absent fathers, and they need a strong male to mentor and guide them. We all need someone to love us and guide us. We all need an example of manhood.

In 1992, Derek Redmond was a favorite in the 400 meters at the Barcelona Olympics. About 150 meters into the race, he tore his hamstring. Derek collapsed in the middle of the track. Determined to finish the race, he stumbled forward. His dad broke through security and came to walk alongside his son. They crossed the finish line together. This was a global expression of what it means for a father to love and guide his son.


In life and in ministry, we all meet difficult people. Difficult people are those people who never approve of anything you do and always feel the need to let you know their disapproval. They consume much more of your time than is necessary just so they can complain about things that may or may not be under your control. These may be great people and they may have great intentions, but their emotions have taken over their brains. Their actions are not normal, and certainly not constructive. Whether they’re complaints are right or wrong, these “difficult people” can suck the life out of you.

I don’t have a foolproof way of dealing with difficult people, but I have picked up a few things over the years. Here are 5 tips for dealing with difficult people in a healthy way:

1. Don’t get defensive
When you become defensive, it paralyzes your ability to make good decisions. Most of the time, these people are approaching you with an outburst of emotion. The worst thing you can do is to respond by letting your emotions get out of control.

2. Respond with grace
No matter what they say or do, respond with an attitude of grace. When the Pharisees would complain or hurl insults at Jesus, He always kept a spirit of grace. Sure, Jesus would rebuke them. But He would also take the time to teach them to understand the Truth. Colossians 4:6 says, “Let your conversation be always full of grace, seasoned with salt, so that you may know how to answer everyone.”

3. Listen closely for what they’re NOT saying
I’ve found that some complaints are only the tip of a much larger iceberg. Listen for clues that might point to the larger problem. It could be that they have been hurt by you or someone else, and their complaints are just a symptom of a much deeper wound.

4. Work toward resolution
The best way to deal with difficult people is to solve the difficult situation. Look for solutions without compromising your calling or vision for the ministry. Even with the most difficult people, they will often shed light on real problems that need to be solved.

5. When necessary, cut ties
There comes a time when it is healthier for you and the other person to just cut ties. Again, try to do so with a spirit of grace, but get out of dodge. In ministry, there is way too much at stake for you to be consumed by one difficult person. For the sake of the ministry, separate yourself from that person and move on.

What tips do you have for dealing with difficult people?